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HealthExpress Guide to June Health Events

Published : Sunday June 1, 2014 | Posted in : HealthExpress News
Doctor showing patient a lung x ray

This month's health events guide is a particularly special one, as it marks the one year anniversary of our first blog post in this series. We hope you've enjoyed them so far, and hopefully we will continue to bring new information and events to your attention and refresh your memory of the ones we mentioned last year!

Following a bumper month of May, June is shaping up to have a similarly varied schedule of campaigns from various charities and organisations. As always, we have focused on just a few of these, so please do let us know in the comments if we've missed a campaign that is important to you.

Cervical Screening Awareness Week: 8/6/14 - 14/6/14

Hashtags: #CSAW14

This campaign aims to highlight the importance of cervical screening, emphasising that attending regular screenings is essential in detecting abnormalities that could indicate cervical cancer. In the UK, 22% of women do not attend their screening when invited. Barriers to attendance include problems making time for an appointment, embarrassment and fear of pain. The charity behind this campaign, Jo's Cervical Cancer Trust, hope to increase public awareness of screening, cervical abnormalities and cervical cancer during this week.

You can find out more about this event by visiting their website.

Diabetes Week: 8/6/14 - 14/6/14

Hashtags: #iCan #DiabetesWeek

Diabetes Week is an annual fundraising and awareness campaign by Diabetes UK. The theme this year is 'I Can', encouraging people with diabetes to come forward and tell the story of how they've overcome their condition and what they've achieved, despite difficulties.

This year is the 80th anniversary of the foundation of Diabetes UK, so they and other organisations will also be highlighting the progress made so far in improving the lives of those with diabetes, as well as emphasising what still needs to be done in terms of recognition and rights, treatment and finding a cure for the condition.

Men's Health Week: 9/6/14 - 15/6/14

Hashtags: #MHW14

This is a campaign led by The Men's Health Forum, which this year will focus on the theme of health and work. This encompasses work-related health issues and the impact of unemployment on health.

Men are nearly twice as likely to be in full time work as women. Longer working hours have been linked to a greater risk of anxiety and depression, heart disease and even premature death. According to the Forum's website, absence from work due to stress, anxiety and depression has increased 29% in the last three years, and the impact of poor mental health on businesses has been estimated at £26 billion a year. Meanwhile, unemployment has also been linked to poor mental health and increased risk of heart attack.

Men's Health Week aims to raise awareness of these statistics, and encourage employers to take action to safeguard their employees' health. Visit the website for more information.

World Blood Donor Day: 14/6/14

Hashtags: #GiveBlood

Now in it's 10th year, the theme for this year's campaign by the World Health Organisation is 'safe blood for saving mothers.' This refers to the importance of all countries having access to safe blood and blood products in order to prevent maternal deaths. The WHO's target is for all countries to reach 100% of their blood supplies being from voluntary, unpaid donors by 2020, and with this event they hope to encourage more people to donate.

You can read more information and download campaign materials on the WHO website.

Breathe Easy Week: 16/6/14 - 20/6/14

Hashtags: #BreatheEasyWeek

This event, supported by the British Lung Foundation and their Breathe Easy support group network exists to raise awareness of this particular aspect of lung disease. The topic this year is breathlessness and early diagnosis. The BLF are using the week-long campaign to highlight the importance of getting unusual breathlessness checked by a doctor. They emphasise that getting out of breath due to physical exercise or activity is normal, particularly if you're not used to it. But sometimes being short of breath can be a symptom of a lung condition like chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) or asthma.

To find out more about this event, visit the BLF campaign page at the above link.

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